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~ The Hornman Trailer ~

The Hornman is a fiscally sponsored project of the  OL_SFFS_4c_Process_Blue

This means that you can make a tax-deductible donation to support the production of this important film.

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If you want your donation to be tax deductible…

 

If you don’t want a tax deduction…


Write your check to:

“San Francisco Film Society”

and please write “The Hornman-FSP 1450”
in the memo field of your check.


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Write your check to:

“foolish tree films”

and please write “The Hornman Movie”
in the memo field of your check.

Then mail to:

San Francisco Film Society
ATTN: Finance Dept

39 Mesa St. Suite 110
San Francisco, CA 94129

(7% deducted for SFFS administrative fees)

Then mail it to:

foolish tree films
ATTN: Hornman Movie Donations

280 Granada Ave #2
San Francisco, CA 94112


OR Donate online right now
through the SF Film Society:

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  (10% deducted for SFFS administrative fees)


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OR Donate online right now
through Paypal:

 

(3.5% deducted by Paypal)


 Learn more about the film
and how you can help. 

Hornman Movie Funding Proposal

The Hornman Funding Proposal

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If you have video or film, please contact jo@foolishtree.com

  


 

RESEARCH FACT: An analysis of 10 years of SAT data revealed that students who took four years of arts courses in high school earned the highest scores on both the verbal and math SAT. (Vaughn et al., 2000)


“Having led several units of men with two left feet, I am thankful for the example of a calmer, more rational form of leadership, and so, I might add, are several hundred U.S. soldiers. Since I started studying trombone in the third grade, I always had that kind of leadership and teaching style as an example in my life.”                             

~ Howard Grether, former student, Major U.S. Army Retired, Pastor


“I don’t know how you handled me but when you infected me with John Phillip Sousa, you changed my life!”

~ Jim Klippert, former student, Professional New Orleans jazz trombonist


Bill Nemoyten has ignited a love and appreciation for the arts in thousands of people for over seventy years. And how did it all start? With a beat up old student trombone and free lessons at his Cleveland public school. That one opportunity showed him his calling and set him on the path he still travels today.

The Hornman documentary follows this path, revealing an inspirational and complex American story. Bill’s own school music teachers had such a profound influence that he became one himself. By age 32 he had a wife, 4 children, a mortgage and a dog—the ‘50s American Dream. Then, in the late 1960s, a series of chance events ushered him into the then fledgling field of Arts Administration, leading to prestigious and challenging positions in Illinois and the San Francisco Bay Area.

But this is not a film about everything always working out.

It’s also about growing up during the Great Depression and WWII. It’s about being the father of rebellious teenagers and a gay son, a husband who lost his wife of 35 years to cancer and a dedicated arts advocate who lost his job to California’s Proposition 13. But no matter what life throws his way, Bill keeps playing and inspiring. He spent his early sixties again teaching public school music. Then, in “retirement,” he created The Hornman Show and became a serious writer of memoirs, essays and fiction.

Bill’s students have passed his inspiration on to their children and grandchildren. How many generations, denied the proven benefits of an arts education, have already missed the opportunity to find their hidden talents and fulfilling life paths? This is the ultimate question of The Hornman.


 

See more video clips of  The Hornman

 

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